2011-2012 Huskies Basketball Player Grades


                                                                         
Photo Credit: Stephen Dunn/Getty Images

Andrew Andrews: N/A. Andrews red-shirted this season as a result of the Huskies’ supposed depth in the backcourt. Honestly, there’s not a lot to say about his season besides that he constantly receives high praise from teammates and coaches. There’s no doubt in my mind Andrews could have helped out at times this season. He will be a huge X-factor next year for the Dawgs and can easily play a large part in determining the success of next year’s team.

Martin Breunig: B-. Breunig is a 6’8, athletic freak who could not find a spot in the rotation. I expected to see him flash some brilliance this season, which he did, but he is not a strong defender and needs to improve the variety in his offensive skill-set. The German freshman has a chance to make a big leap next year with Darnell Gant leaving, as he will compete with Desmond Simmons, Shawn Kemp and redshirt freshman Jernard Jarreau. It was certainly a shock to see Kemp Jr. steal nearly all of Breunig’s playing time as the season progressed.

Abdul Gaddy: B-. The junior point guard saved himself from falling into the “C” category by finishing the season with authority. Despite being infuriatingly inconsistent and unconfident, Gaddy gave Montlake over his final seven games, averaging over 9 points to go along with 6.8 assists to only 2.2 turnovers per game. Gaddy’s jump-shot and driving ability were maddening throughout the season, as he can get past defenders at will but lacks the confidence to do so. When he was successful off the dribble, defenders would back off and Abdul would proceed to tentatively shoot a jumper. All of this said, he needs some credit, as this was his first season back from a horrific ACL tear. Gaddy has the potential to take over this team next year and (warning: bias prediction on the horizon) be a dark horse for Pac-12 Player of the Year.

Darnell Gant: B+: Birdman finished his storied career at Washington by adding yet another Pac-12 title to his resume. Gant lost his starting job to his protege Desmond Simmons just three games into the conference season before regaining it for the final four games of the season and kept it throughout Washington’s post-season run. The senior forward was able to take his demotion and loss of minutes in-stride, while still posting career highs in minutes (24.5), points (7.2), rebounds (5.4), assists (.8) and field-goal percentage (46.6%). Darnell Gant has embodied the Husky mantra over his five seasons with the program and will be dearly missed.

Jernard Jarreau: N/A. Ok, I will start this off by saying I do not know very much about Jarreau. However, I do know that he is 6’10 and from New Orleans. I mean come on. That is awesome. I also know that he tends to play like a guard, which is insane considering this kid is one big elastic band. I am excited for Jarreau’s prospects as a Husky. The Dawgs have not this many tall people at once in a long time and that is pretty interesting.

Shawn Kemp Jr:B+: I was very unsure of what to think when I heard the news that UW had signed Kemp Jr. I thought, “oh, cool, an average big man with an athletic freak of a dad” and that was about it. I did not expect him to crack the lineup. He proved me wrong, averaging 6.5 minutes per game and proving to be a valuable defensive asset when Aziz N’Diaye was in foul trouble. Ultimately, Kemp Jr.’s basketball ability was a pleasant surprise, as my expectations were fairly low. I look forward to seeing him improve his scoring ability from inside 10 feet going into next fall.

Aziz N’Diaye: A-. The amount of times I yelled “Ahhhhhhh Azzziiiizzzz” this season was unexpected. And that is a great thing. N’Diaye became a low-post scoring threat as well as a first team All Pac-12 defender in his second season at UW. He gets the “Most Improved” award. I did not think I’d see the day where he would be able to catch a pass while streaking to the basket, yet alone a Tony Wroten pass. N’Diaye is a lock to make an impact next season, proving that you can’t teach height, but you can teach things to a person with lots of height. Even if those things are just catching a basketball and making a jump-hook. The next thing for Aziz is improving on his 39.7% shooting from the free-throw line. Good god that is low.

Terrence Ross: B+. Is B+ neutral enough for a guy who everyone expected to do more and then did more in the NIT? Ross was wildly disappointing in non-conference play and was one of the biggest reasons UW started out 5-5. Ross put the team on his back and was responsible for single-handily bringing the Huskies at least 3 victories. However, with the scoring ability that he clearly has, Ross should have been responsible for for many more wins and a trip to the NCAA Tournament. It’s hard to be upset with a sophomore who was not starting last year, who averaged 16.4 points and 6.5 rebounds this year and was arguably the best player in the conference. Yet, most Husky fans were extremely unhappy with Ross’ consistency until the last third of the season. That is what draft hype will do to a fan-base.

Austin Seferian-Jenkins: :). ASJ gets a smile. He played basketball this season, what more can Husky Nation ask for from a future NFL tight-end? Seferian-Jenkins joined the team midway through the season and still managed to average more than 7 minutes per game. ASJ was played a huge role in UW’s NIT victory over UO, getting 15 minutes of playing time. He still needs to develop a better sense of awareness on both ends, as his defense is what limited his minutes, but he can certainly build off of a strong freshman season. His physical presence immediately changed the dynamic of this team and other forwards followed his lead, banging around in the paint.

Brendan Sherrer: A+: The Huskies were 8-0 in games where Sherrer played this season. That is a good statistic, no matter how good one actually is at basketball. Sherrer lived his dream over the past three seasons and that is something to be very proud of. Husky Nation wishes Brendan all the best.

Desmond Simmons: A: Dez shocked everyone this season in becoming Darnell Gant 2.0. Simmons brought the hustle to a team that wasn’t sure if they wanted to hustle or not. Gant’s protege proved to be just as good as Gant, despite being only a freshman. He was the glue on this year’s team. I cannot say enough about his effort on the floor, not to mention his ability to knock down open shots. Simmons exceeded everyone’s expectations this season and will have no problem locking up a lot of minutes for the Dawgs over his next three years. He is one of the most mature freshman I have seen come through Washington.

Hikeem Stewart: D: I know Stewart is a freshman, but I was still extremely disappointed in his ability. Stewart was not ready to compete for a big, DI basketball school and it showed. Stewart advocates will say that his strength is on the defensive end. He is “strong” defensively compared to the rest of his game. That is not saying a lot. His defense is nothing spectacular. I do not see where Hikeem fits into this team over the coming three years. Stewart is not big, quick or athletic enough to make up for his inefficiencies on the offensive end. He was one Tony Wroten’s closest friends on the team, so that counts for something.

Scott Suggs: N/A: Suggs was forced to redshirt following a foot injury that caused him to miss the first half of the season. The Dawgs dearly missed Suggs, despite feeling confident that they were deep enough at guard to still compete at a high-level without him. Scottro has been a force to be reckoned with on the practice courts and will be a primary scoring threat next year with the improvement of his driving ability.

Alex Wegner: N/A: The Vashon Island native appeared in just six games this season as a walk-on freshman. He banked a three at the beginning of the year, which is neat. It is yet to be determined if he will turn into a human victory cigar such as Sherrer or decide to transfer to a school where he could actually receive playing time

C.J. Wilcox: Incomplete: CJ was injured for over half the season and still was one of the biggest scoring threats off the bench in college basketball. I was extremely impressed with his driving ability this season, as he proved that he can do more than shoot the ball. It was a shame that Wilcox was hurt, as he was noticeably less explosive in the second half of the season. That said, nobody should be surprised if he leads the conference in scoring next season. CJ’s offensive skill-set translates much better to the college game than Terrence Ross’.

Tony Wroten: B: There is no way to put a letter-grade to my emotions towards Wroten. There is also no way to make everyone happy with a letter-grade evaluating Wroten. Thus, he gets a B. Tony could have been much, much better this season. He also could have been much worse. Who attacks the basket for the Dawgs in non-conference play if not for Wroten? Nobody, that’s who. The Pac-12 Freshman of the Year averaged 16 points, 5 rebounds and nearly 4 assists per game. The way he got those stats was infuriating to most, as he relentless drove to the rim and did not leave the paint until the ball was in the basket. Wroten also made numerous boneheaded turnovers. Basically, he did everything in his power to make “old school” basketball enthusiasts furious. Lackadaisical and gambling defense, unnecessarily flashy plays, horrible free-throws and 100 mile an hour passes to a big man notorious for dropping the ball. Wroten also did a lot of things that casual basketball fans love. He was a lightening rod on the court (whether or not the Dawgs needed one) and brought unmeasurablely large quantities swag to a Husky team that didn’t necessarily need it. He had his positives and his negatives on the court. Hence, a B. I will need to write a full on report on Wroten in the coming days as I clearly have not tied up any loose ends in the last paragraph.

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